National Detective Programme FAQs

Choose a category below to view the FAQs.

Application, recruitment & selection process - National Detective Programme

Yes, candidates can choose which force they would like to apply to upon completing their initial application form.

For further details on each force we have partnered with historically, please visit the Forces page.

The Equality Act 2010 applies to all appointments in the Police Service and we welcome applications from individuals with disabilities. Adjustments will be made to selection processes and/or the working environment, provided it is reasonable in all circumstances to do so.

If you have questions about your specific application or adjustments, please email us at [email protected].

Candidates with a specific learning difficulty, e.g. dyslexia, can request reasonable adjustments during the assessment process upon submission of documentary evidence compiled by a qualified professional e.g. a chartered psychologist. The report or assessment should have been written since your 16th birthday. Information on how to get an assessment for dyslexia or a report evidencing that you have a specific learning difficulty is on the British Dyslexia Association website.

Yes – all new recruits need to be fit and healthy. The fitness test will be undertaken by your force and consists of a shuttle run. Further information can be found here.

The role of a detective can be physically and mentally demanding and we must test your physical ability. Please have a look at this document for more details regarding the medical assessment and this document which should provide clearer insight into any medical considerations which would not be suitable for the role.

The Police Force’s Medical Practitioner will need to liaise with your own GP in regard to your medical history. The Home Office requires our medical team to review a form that has been signed off by a General Practitioner who holds your medical notes. You cannot enter the Police Service unless this is done, so please make sure you are registered with an NHS GP, and do not move to another GP during the recruitment process.

Yes, all applicants will be subjected to a substance misuse test during the course of the selection process. Your consent will be sought to take either a hair, urine or saliva sample prior to the test. Failure to provide a sample will result in your application being terminated. Please note, any instances of substance misuse in the prior 12 months to applying may negatively impact upon your application.

We will primarily contact you by email but sometimes also by telephone. Please make sure these details are always current and up to date once you have applied.

All successful candidates will need to provide a reference from their undergraduate university, any current employment, or previous employment if this is not applicable, and a personal reference. Anyone who has been employed by a Police Service or the Armed Forces, no matter for what duration or how long ago, will require a reference from this employment as well.

References will be sought three months before your start date, between receiving a conditional and final offer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

You will apply for the force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the forces we are partnered with.

Please contact [email protected] to speak to the Graduate Recruitment Team who will be able to advise on any problems you may be having.

You submit an online application, and then complete some online tests and a video job insight exercise online. You can sit all of these elements at a time and place that suits you, whether that’s early in the morning or late into the night. We recommend you pick somewhere quiet and try and complete each exercise in one sitting. Please note you will have to attend an assessment centre in person.

Please email our graduate recruitment team at [email protected]

Your starting salary will depend on the force that you join. To find out more about the salary and benefits of a trainee detective constable role, please click here.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

You’ll start with 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of at least two rest days each working week.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

All participants will have a dedicated Recruitment Officer that will support them throughout the assessment and onboarding process. You will also be supported by a Police Now Leadership Development Officer throughout the two-year programme. Within force, participants will work very closely with a Detective Mentor, an experienced detective to help with the operational day to day demands of investigative work and of course you will also have the support of a line-manager.

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two-year probation period, you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable). We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Modern investigative work is very varied. As such, there will be elements of the role that require you to be on the frontline for example at crime scenes and speaking with victims and witnesses. There is of course an amount of work that is more office based such as interviewing suspects and preparing cases for court.

Following the in force training you will undertake an immersion period in police uniform on a Response Team to continue to practice and develop your core policing skills. From time to time, detectives have to put police uniform on and patrol the streets (e.g. large public order events such as protest events).

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two year probation period (which is standard for all newly joining constables to the police) you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable).  We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Of course! Police Now is an ever-growing family for which you will always be an ambassador and alumni member of our network for life.

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

Becoming a trainee detective constable

Your starting salary will depend on the force that you join. To find out more about the salary and benefits of a trainee detective constable role, please click here.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

You’ll start with 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of at least two rest days each working week.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

All participants will have a dedicated Recruitment Officer that will support them throughout the assessment and onboarding process. You will also be supported by a Police Now Leadership Development Officer throughout the two-year programme. Within force, participants will work very closely with a Detective Mentor, an experienced detective to help with the operational day to day demands of investigative work and of course you will also have the support of a line-manager.

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two-year probation period, you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable). We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Modern investigative work is very varied. As such, there will be elements of the role that require you to be on the frontline for example at crime scenes and speaking with victims and witnesses. There is of course an amount of work that is more office based such as interviewing suspects and preparing cases for court.

Following the in force training you will undertake an immersion period in police uniform on a Response Team to continue to practice and develop your core policing skills. From time to time, detectives have to put police uniform on and patrol the streets (e.g. large public order events such as protest events).

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

Beyond the programme - National Detective Programme

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two year probation period (which is standard for all newly joining constables to the police) you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable).  We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Of course! Police Now is an ever-growing family for which you will always be an ambassador and alumni member of our network for life.

Eligibility - National Detective Programme

Following the review of our 2019 pilot, we have removed the requirement of two years’ prior work experience. In it’s place, we will assess for work place maturity and professional credibility during the recruitment process.

Yes, candidates can choose which force they would like to apply to upon completing their initial application form.

For further details on each force we have partnered with historically, please visit the Forces page.

The Equality Act 2010 applies to all appointments in the Police Service and we welcome applications from individuals with disabilities. Adjustments will be made to selection processes and/or the working environment, provided it is reasonable in all circumstances to do so.

If you have questions about your specific application or adjustments, please email us at [email protected].

Candidates with a specific learning difficulty, e.g. dyslexia, can request reasonable adjustments during the assessment process upon submission of documentary evidence compiled by a qualified professional e.g. a chartered psychologist. The report or assessment should have been written since your 16th birthday. Information on how to get an assessment for dyslexia or a report evidencing that you have a specific learning difficulty is on the British Dyslexia Association website.

Yes – all new recruits need to be fit and healthy. The fitness test will be undertaken by your force and consists of a shuttle run. Further information can be found here.

The role of a detective can be physically and mentally demanding and we must test your physical ability. Please have a look at this document for more details regarding the medical assessment and this document which should provide clearer insight into any medical considerations which would not be suitable for the role.

The Police Force’s Medical Practitioner will need to liaise with your own GP in regard to your medical history. The Home Office requires our medical team to review a form that has been signed off by a General Practitioner who holds your medical notes. You cannot enter the Police Service unless this is done, so please make sure you are registered with an NHS GP, and do not move to another GP during the recruitment process.

Yes, all applicants will be subjected to a substance misuse test during the course of the selection process. Your consent will be sought to take either a hair, urine or saliva sample prior to the test. Failure to provide a sample will result in your application being terminated. Please note, any instances of substance misuse in the prior 12 months to applying may negatively impact upon your application.

We will primarily contact you by email but sometimes also by telephone. Please make sure these details are always current and up to date once you have applied.

All successful candidates will need to provide a reference from their undergraduate university, any current employment, or previous employment if this is not applicable, and a personal reference. Anyone who has been employed by a Police Service or the Armed Forces, no matter for what duration or how long ago, will require a reference from this employment as well.

References will be sought three months before your start date, between receiving a conditional and final offer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

You will apply for the force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the forces we are partnered with.

Please contact [email protected] to speak to the Graduate Recruitment Team who will be able to advise on any problems you may be having.

You submit an online application, and then complete some online tests and a video job insight exercise online. You can sit all of these elements at a time and place that suits you, whether that’s early in the morning or late into the night. We recommend you pick somewhere quiet and try and complete each exercise in one sitting. Please note you will have to attend an assessment centre in person.

Please email our graduate recruitment team at [email protected]

You will apply for the zone and force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the force and availability when you’re offered a role. You will receive further details from the force once you have received an offer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

Both programmes are mission focused, with participants aiming to transform communities by reducing crime and increasing the public’s confidence in policing.

The main difference between the programmes is the day-to-day work you will experience. As a neighbourhood police officer on the National Graduate Leadership Programme, you will be an active and visible leader in the community you serve, understanding the issues and building relationships with residents, the local authorities and organisations. Using this intelligence, you’ll put in place strategies that help create long-term solutions to solve crime and improve the lives of those living in the community.

As a trainee detective constable on the National Detective Programme, you will use your investigative mindset to explore reported criminal activities, piecing together evidence and building cases to take to court. Your role will involve speaking to and interviewing both suspects and victims of crime, using your empathetic nature to gain insight on all aspects of the reported incident.

Both programmes provide a fantastic platform for a career within the police and the opportunity to have a positive, tangible impact on society.

All Detective participants will be required to pass the National Investigators Exam (NIE) in November 2019. Participants will achieve full Professionalising Investigation Programme Stage 2 (PIP2) accreditation by programme completion.

The Detective Academy is residential however you will be able to return home on a Friday evening for the weekend. You will be unable to take annual leave for this period – this is when you’ll start your employment as a Police Officer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

Your starting salary will depend on the force that you join. To find out more about the salary and benefits of a trainee detective constable role, please click here.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

You’ll start with 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of at least two rest days each working week.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

All participants will have a dedicated Recruitment Officer that will support them throughout the assessment and onboarding process. You will also be supported by a Police Now Leadership Development Officer throughout the two-year programme. Within force, participants will work very closely with a Detective Mentor, an experienced detective to help with the operational day to day demands of investigative work and of course you will also have the support of a line-manager.

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two-year probation period, you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable). We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Modern investigative work is very varied. As such, there will be elements of the role that require you to be on the frontline for example at crime scenes and speaking with victims and witnesses. There is of course an amount of work that is more office based such as interviewing suspects and preparing cases for court.

Following the in force training you will undertake an immersion period in police uniform on a Response Team to continue to practice and develop your core policing skills. From time to time, detectives have to put police uniform on and patrol the streets (e.g. large public order events such as protest events).

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two year probation period (which is standard for all newly joining constables to the police) you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable).  We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Of course! Police Now is an ever-growing family for which you will always be an ambassador and alumni member of our network for life.

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

The Detective Academy is residential however you will be able to return home on a Friday evening for the weekend. You will be unable to take annual leave for this period – this is when you’ll start your employment as a Police Officer.

All Detective participants will be required to pass the National Investigators Exam (NIE) during the programme. Participants will achieve full Professionalising Investigation Programme Stage 2 (PIP2) accreditation by programme completion.

As part of the programme you will also complete a bespoke Graduate Diploma in Professional Policing Practice with the University of Huddersfield, which allows you to step back from the day-to-day and learn the theory to drive real change for the communities you will serve. Our graduate diploma is distinctive due to its positioning as an essential and core part of training and developing outstanding leaders in policing.

Drawing on the latest elements and developments within the criminological landscape, top academic experts will deliver a nationally-recognised course. Your studies will give you the chance to learn and develop your skills and knowledge in a variety of ways utilising an expansive hub of resources that will challenge you in the most engaging way possible.

Both programmes are mission focused, with participants aiming to transform communities by reducing crime and increasing the public’s confidence in policing.nThe main difference between the programmes is the day-to-day work you will experience. As a neighbourhood police officer on the National Graduate Leadership Programme, you will be an active and visible leader in the community you serve, understanding the issues and building relationships with residents, the local authorities and organisations. Using this intelligence, you’ll put in place strategies that help create long-term solutions to solve crime and improve the lives of those living in the community. As a trainee detective constable on the National Detective Programme, you will use your investigative mindset to explore reported criminal activities, piecing together evidence and building cases to take to court. Your role will involve speaking to and interviewing both suspects and victims of crime, using your emphathetic nature to gain insight on all aspects of the reported incident. Both programmes provide a fantastic platform for a career within the police and the opportunity to have a positive, tangible impact on society.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

You will apply for the area and force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the force. You will receive further details from the force once you have received an offer.

It takes a particular combination of skills and abilities to become a Police Now participant. We are looking for ambition, focus, drive and resilience, and a passion and commitment for public service.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

Yes, we welcome applications from career changers and believe existing life and work experiences can be a real benefit when it comes to being a great detective.

As Police Now is an independent charity it does not matter if you are applying to another police service at the same time or have recently applied and been unsuccessful.

Police Now is a graduate programme and therefore we only take applications from those currently at or graduated from university. If your interest in the Police continues, we would recommend looking towards an individual police force to join the Special Constabulary or apply for standard entry as a Police Constable.

Of course. We would only advise to listen to any feedback given during the last recruitment process as there will be similarities in the format of the Detective process for instance.

Following the review of our 2019 pilot, we have removed the requirement of two years’ prior work experience. In it’s place, we will assess for work place maturity and professional credibility during the recruitment process.

Candidates that have secured a place on the National Graduate Leadership Programme are unable to switch to the National Detective Programme.

You can only apply to one Police Now programme per intake year and therefore if you have already applied to our 2019 National Graduate Leadership Programme you would not be eligible for our Detective programme. If you applied to our National Graduate Leadership Programme for previous intake years you would be eligible to apply for our 2020 National Detective Programme.

You are unable to apply to Police Now if you are currently or have previously been a serving police officer or have been attested and started training. Police Now is not a way for officers to transfer between police services or return to the police service.nnYou are still eligible to apply if you are currently or have previously been a police cadet, special constable, PCSO or member of police staff for any force.

You must declare any convictions, cautions, charges, summonses, pending prosecutions or investigations. Ideally, you should not have a record containing any of the above. We need to be careful when recruiting, as a police officer with criminal associations or convictions may be vulnerable to disclose information, and certain offences can also undermine an officer’s position as a witness in court. Further details can be found here.

Tattoos are not a total bar to appointment. However, some tattoos could potentially offend members of the public or colleagues, or could be considered lewd, garish or provocative depending on their size, nature and location and therefore will not be accepted. Due to this, as part of the application process, you must declare and document any tattoos you have.

Please review the following document to see if the force you wish to apply to has any force specific requirements.

You will need to have lived in the UK continuously for the past three years in order to apply. If you’ve been abroad during the last three years while serving in the UK Armed Forces, working for the UK government or if you studied abroad as part of your university degree, your application will still be considered.

You can be of any nationality to apply, provided you have the status of indefinite leave to remain and you work in the UK. If you are a UK citizen or citizen of a member state of the EEA, you will have this status. If you are a citizen of a non-EEA state, you must be able to provide evidence of your passport and residency documentation.

Applications can be accepted from the age of 18. There is no upper age limit for applying to the police service, but bear in mind that the normal retirement age is 60 years and that new constable recruits are required to undertake a two year probationary period.

There is no requirement to complete the Certificate in Knowledge of Policing (CKP). You will have to complete some study before joining the programme, but this is a bespoke pre-learn for Police Now which will come at no financial cost to you.

As long as your degree is equivalent to a minimum of a 2:2 undergraduate degree from a UK university, you are still eligible. Please note that all educational certificates will be checked and for those that are not in English, a full certified translation must be provided.

Yes, we recognise Key Skills Level 2 as equivalent to a GCSE Grade C in English Language.

Unfortunately, our eligibility criteria requires a 2.2 or above at undergraduate degree.

Of course, as long as you predict to receive a 2:2 or above from a UK university or equivalent from a non-UK university by the time the academy is due to begin.

You must have, or be predicted, a minimum of a 2:2 undergraduate degree from a university in the UK or an equivalent from a non-UK university. We do not screen applications on GCSE, A Level grades or UCAS points, however we do take any grades attained for our information, so there will be a section to input these on your application.

Applications are expected to open in Spring 2020.

National Detective Programme

Yes, candidates can choose which force they would like to apply to upon completing their initial application form.

For further details on each force we have partnered with historically, please visit the Forces page.

The Equality Act 2010 applies to all appointments in the Police Service and we welcome applications from individuals with disabilities. Adjustments will be made to selection processes and/or the working environment, provided it is reasonable in all circumstances to do so.

If you have questions about your specific application or adjustments, please email us at [email protected].

Candidates with a specific learning difficulty, e.g. dyslexia, can request reasonable adjustments during the assessment process upon submission of documentary evidence compiled by a qualified professional e.g. a chartered psychologist. The report or assessment should have been written since your 16th birthday. Information on how to get an assessment for dyslexia or a report evidencing that you have a specific learning difficulty is on the British Dyslexia Association website.

Yes – all new recruits need to be fit and healthy. The fitness test will be undertaken by your force and consists of a shuttle run. Further information can be found here.

The role of a detective can be physically and mentally demanding and we must test your physical ability. Please have a look at this document for more details regarding the medical assessment and this document which should provide clearer insight into any medical considerations which would not be suitable for the role.

The Police Force’s Medical Practitioner will need to liaise with your own GP in regard to your medical history. The Home Office requires our medical team to review a form that has been signed off by a General Practitioner who holds your medical notes. You cannot enter the Police Service unless this is done, so please make sure you are registered with an NHS GP, and do not move to another GP during the recruitment process.

Yes, all applicants will be subjected to a substance misuse test during the course of the selection process. Your consent will be sought to take either a hair, urine or saliva sample prior to the test. Failure to provide a sample will result in your application being terminated. Please note, any instances of substance misuse in the prior 12 months to applying may negatively impact upon your application.

We will primarily contact you by email but sometimes also by telephone. Please make sure these details are always current and up to date once you have applied.

All successful candidates will need to provide a reference from their undergraduate university, any current employment, or previous employment if this is not applicable, and a personal reference. Anyone who has been employed by a Police Service or the Armed Forces, no matter for what duration or how long ago, will require a reference from this employment as well.

References will be sought three months before your start date, between receiving a conditional and final offer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

You will apply for the force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the forces we are partnered with.

Please contact [email protected] to speak to the Graduate Recruitment Team who will be able to advise on any problems you may be having.

You submit an online application, and then complete some online tests and a video job insight exercise online. You can sit all of these elements at a time and place that suits you, whether that’s early in the morning or late into the night. We recommend you pick somewhere quiet and try and complete each exercise in one sitting. Please note you will have to attend an assessment centre in person.

Please email our graduate recruitment team at [email protected]

You will apply for the zone and force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the force and availability when you’re offered a role. You will receive further details from the force once you have received an offer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

Both programmes are mission focused, with participants aiming to transform communities by reducing crime and increasing the public’s confidence in policing.

The main difference between the programmes is the day-to-day work you will experience. As a neighbourhood police officer on the National Graduate Leadership Programme, you will be an active and visible leader in the community you serve, understanding the issues and building relationships with residents, the local authorities and organisations. Using this intelligence, you’ll put in place strategies that help create long-term solutions to solve crime and improve the lives of those living in the community.

As a trainee detective constable on the National Detective Programme, you will use your investigative mindset to explore reported criminal activities, piecing together evidence and building cases to take to court. Your role will involve speaking to and interviewing both suspects and victims of crime, using your empathetic nature to gain insight on all aspects of the reported incident.

Both programmes provide a fantastic platform for a career within the police and the opportunity to have a positive, tangible impact on society.

All Detective participants will be required to pass the National Investigators Exam (NIE) in November 2019. Participants will achieve full Professionalising Investigation Programme Stage 2 (PIP2) accreditation by programme completion.

The Detective Academy is residential however you will be able to return home on a Friday evening for the weekend. You will be unable to take annual leave for this period – this is when you’ll start your employment as a Police Officer.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

Your starting salary will depend on the force that you join. To find out more about the salary and benefits of a trainee detective constable role, please click here.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

You’ll start with 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of at least two rest days each working week.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

All participants will have a dedicated Recruitment Officer that will support them throughout the assessment and onboarding process. You will also be supported by a Police Now Leadership Development Officer throughout the two-year programme. Within force, participants will work very closely with a Detective Mentor, an experienced detective to help with the operational day to day demands of investigative work and of course you will also have the support of a line-manager.

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two-year probation period, you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable). We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Modern investigative work is very varied. As such, there will be elements of the role that require you to be on the frontline for example at crime scenes and speaking with victims and witnesses. There is of course an amount of work that is more office based such as interviewing suspects and preparing cases for court.

Following the in force training you will undertake an immersion period in police uniform on a Response Team to continue to practice and develop your core policing skills. From time to time, detectives have to put police uniform on and patrol the streets (e.g. large public order events such as protest events).

Once you successfully finish the programme and your two year probation period (which is standard for all newly joining constables to the police) you will be a Detective Constable (rather than a Trainee Detective Constable).  We expect participants to commit to a long-term investigative career and many pathways will be open to you. It is anticipated at the end of your probation, having been exposed to a range of challenges, you may wish to stay in your current role, apply for a lateral development opportunity such as within a specialist unit or you may feel you have the necessary skills and motivation to apply for promotion.

Of course! Police Now is an ever-growing family for which you will always be an ambassador and alumni member of our network for life.

Participants will be exposed to a wide variety of investigative police work. This will vary according to your posting. For example, in a Main Office CID you will likely be working on serious and complex crimes such as Grievous Bodily Harm or Robbery compared to in a Safeguarding posting you may be dealing with domestic abuse, missing persons or serious sexual offences.

You will typically be required to work 40 hours a week. However, the 24-hour nature of policing means that there’s no such thing as a 9-5 routine. You will normally be expected to work five or six shifts a week, often at night or over the weekend, although working patterns can vary according to the needs of the Service

All forces also offer a range of hugely competitive benefits which are described on their websites. When you start as a trainee detective constable you’ll automatically be enrolled as a member of the Police Pension Scheme 2015. This isn’t compulsory, and you can opt out if you wish. There are various partner organisations who work alongside the Police to offer a variety of financial services, including saving, investment and protection products as well as discounts and subsidies. Similarly, many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers.

Your starting salary will commence on day one of the Detective Academy. Your first and subsequent pay dates will depend on the force that you join.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

The Detective Academy is residential however you will be able to return home on a Friday evening for the weekend. You will be unable to take annual leave for this period – this is when you’ll start your employment as a Police Officer.

All Detective participants will be required to pass the National Investigators Exam (NIE) during the programme. Participants will achieve full Professionalising Investigation Programme Stage 2 (PIP2) accreditation by programme completion.

As part of the programme you will also complete a bespoke Graduate Diploma in Professional Policing Practice with the University of Huddersfield, which allows you to step back from the day-to-day and learn the theory to drive real change for the communities you will serve. Our graduate diploma is distinctive due to its positioning as an essential and core part of training and developing outstanding leaders in policing.

Drawing on the latest elements and developments within the criminological landscape, top academic experts will deliver a nationally-recognised course. Your studies will give you the chance to learn and develop your skills and knowledge in a variety of ways utilising an expansive hub of resources that will challenge you in the most engaging way possible.

Both programmes are mission focused, with participants aiming to transform communities by reducing crime and increasing the public’s confidence in policing.nThe main difference between the programmes is the day-to-day work you will experience. As a neighbourhood police officer on the National Graduate Leadership Programme, you will be an active and visible leader in the community you serve, understanding the issues and building relationships with residents, the local authorities and organisations. Using this intelligence, you’ll put in place strategies that help create long-term solutions to solve crime and improve the lives of those living in the community. As a trainee detective constable on the National Detective Programme, you will use your investigative mindset to explore reported criminal activities, piecing together evidence and building cases to take to court. Your role will involve speaking to and interviewing both suspects and victims of crime, using your emphathetic nature to gain insight on all aspects of the reported incident. Both programmes provide a fantastic platform for a career within the police and the opportunity to have a positive, tangible impact on society.

The dates and locations for each Detective Academy cohort will be released on the programme page.

You will apply for the area and force you would like to be allocated to. The decision regarding where you are posted will be made in accordance with the operational requirements of the force. You will receive further details from the force once you have received an offer.

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