Press release

Local Impact – Derbyshire

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Police Now officers tackling crime and anti-social behaviour across Derbyshire

Friday 25 June 2021

Nearly 40,000 fewer anti-social behaviour incidents nationally in areas with Police Now officers – equivalent to 14% fall

Substantial decrease in criminal damage & arson, burglary and theft amongst other crimes 

Police Now attracts and develops the most diverse group of officers in policing

Police Now officers are playing a vital role in tackling crime and anti-social behaviour in Derbyshire.  

Communities where Police Now officers have been posted for the last 22-months have seen 38,772 fewer incidents of anti-social behaviour compared to the same time period from October 2016 – equivalent to a 14 per cent drop.  

Officers on Police Now’s National Graduate Leadership Programme have been working alongside their colleagues within their local neighbourhood teams.  

As well as the drop in anti-social behaviour, communities have also seen 14,301 fewer incidents of criminal damage & arson – a fall of 13 per cent. There were 12,460 fewer incidents of burglary – a fall of 16 per cent – and 31,732 fewer incidents of theft, equivalent to a 14 per cent fall.  

PC Christopher Harrison of Derbyshire Constabulary recently remanded an individual in North East Derbyshire who had been involved in an excess of 60 anti-social behaviour incidents, including indecent exposure, harassing women, harassing one of his neighbours, obstructing pavements and throwing sharpened sticks outside a local retail store.

Attempts to issue warnings and official documents, or to refer the individual to mental health services, proved difficult as the man refused to engage with the police or other agencies. PC Harrison instead drafted a Criminal Behaviour Order (CBO) application and communicated with the courts each morning that the case was due to be heard, speaking with the relevant lawyer about the CBO. The man’s mental health was then more effectively managed and his medication was regularly reviewed.

PC Harrison said “So far issuing the CBO appears to have been a success, with no further incidents and the community commenting on how much healthier and pleasant this individual has become. I can’t take all the credit; not only was this a team effort between the North East Safer Neighbourhoods Team and Local Policing Unit as well as the council, I would imagine a large change to his behaviour was a result of his mental health being more effectively managed. That said, this is a win for the Police and a positive step in community engagement.”

Police Now’s mission is to transform communities by recruiting, developing and inspiring diverse leaders in policing.  

Officers on Police Now’s programmes develop skills in leadership and problem-solving. They share a commitment to public service, fighting crime and inspiring social change alongside their colleagues.  

Police Now has recruited a total of 1,830 officers across 33 forces in the UK, including Derbyshire Constabulary, who have partnered with Police Now for the past two years – with 10 police constables joining the force via this route. 

Police Now consistently recruits more officers who are women or from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds compared to any other entry route into policing. Police Now recruitment data shows that nationally, 17 per cent of those joining Police Now’s National Graduate Leadership Programme in 2020 identified as coming from a black, Asian and minority ethnic background and more than half (54 per cent) identified as women. 

PC Kavhita Sahota, also of Derbyshire Constabulary, said “It is important for members of the public to see a diverse police force. It shows inclusiveness and that everyone, regardless of their background, is welcomed into the police and that we as police officers will in turn treat everyone equally…The moment I had my attestation ceremony in front of my family, colleagues and senior officers in my force was the proudest moment I have had, all of my hard work and determination through training school was for that moment when I was officially welcomed into my force as a constable.”

“We’re incredibly proud of the positive impact our participants continue to have within their local communities, and their commitment to driving positive change with their colleagues so that everyone in our society, including the most vulnerable, have a chance to thrive”.

David Spencer

Co-founder of Police Now and former Detective Chief Inspector

Neighbourhood police officer I Kavhita Sahota

Q&A with Police Constable Kavhita Sahota

Neighbourhood Police Officer

National Graduate Leadership Programme Participant

Derbyshire

Police Now is trying to increase diversity in the force. Do you think having a force that better reflects the community it serves helps to bring down crimes like anti-social behaviour and why?

100% I believe that having a diverse workforce in the police helps in building community relations and also bringing down crime rates. Having diverse police officers that are from different backgrounds and are diverse allows these officers to build better relationships with victims, suspects, witnesses and other members of the public as it brings some comfort and common ground between officers and individuals. This can assist in communication and overall engagement between police and other individuals. It is important for members of the public to see a diverse police force. It shows inclusiveness and that everyone, regardless of their background, is welcomed into the police and that we as police officers will in turn treat everyone equally. It is also important to show diversity as some individuals may be more open and willing to engage with officers they relate to which can in turn reduce crime rates and build relations.

What was the most important lesson you took from your training with Police Now that has enabled you to deal with crime / support your community?

I learnt to how to communicate with people, and how to adapt my communication skills depending on the individual and the scenario I am dealing with. These communication skills have helped me in almost every incident I have been to where there was some form of risk or threat. I am able to communicate as my initial form of tactical skill and this works in most situations.

What has been the moment that you have been most proud of professionally in the last 22 months?

The moment after training where I had my attestation ceremony in front of my family, colleagues and senior officers in my force was the proudest moment I have had, all of my hard work and determination through training school was for this moment when I was officially welcomed into my force as a constable.

Data references

Using data taken from Police Recorded Crime Statistics, the independently peer-reviewed figures compare the 22-month period from October 2016 to July 2018 before any Police Now officers had joined their local communities to the period when they joined from October 2018 to July 2020.

The data presented here is subject to limitations with Police Recorded Crime Statistics and methodology. More details on this are available at the bottom of the following Police Now webpage.

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Media and Communications Manager

HANA TUCKER

Media and Communications Officer

Devon & Cornwall Police

Police Now | Devon & Cornwall Constabulary
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Shaun Sawyer

Chief Constable

National Graduate Leadership Programme

Cohorts: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
No. of police officers enrolled: 8

National Detective Programme

Cohorts: —— —— —— —— 2019 2020
No. of police officers enrolled:

Case studies: